How far can you see?

How far can you see?

17th January – 14th February 2020

 

The exhibition combines historical works of Jesus Rafael Soto and contemporary works of Michal Martychowiec, from whose neon the exhibition takes its title.
The installation is composed of  a neon, large-scale photographs depicting  fragments of landscape, two historical compositions from Soto and slides displayed with projectors. Abstract images from the slides create a points of colourful geometric patches. Martychowiec, through this ostensibly simple and laconic visual message, asks us, the audience, important questions about how we see and perceive both pictures, space and how these perceptions can realate today in regards to the works by masters of the abstract art. The work’s title (‘In memory’)  is somewhat deceptive, as the work itself is more about oblivion than about recollecting or remembering. The principle of duality, so characteristic of most of the artist’s works, the problem of memory and oblivion, the visual perception of inner and outer space are all contained in the questions asked by the author in ‘In Memory’. This work brings past and present closer to one another, whilst maintaining the dynamic balance between spaces and, most importantly, between the seen and the imagined. The pictures of “fragments of time” recorded on the slides are not about a mimetic representation, but about re-presentation created by our imagination. Duality becomes unity here.

 

The practice of the 20th c. avant-garde is the decisive abandonment of the mimetic-representative paradigm, as Giorgio Agamben wrote in his ‘Image, Dream, Awakening’, for newly-discovered areas of the subconscious, the imaginary, and even the purely random. These areas have, to a large extent, shaped the contemporary artistic practices.

Artists Michal Martychowiec, Jesus Rafael Soto